Trophy Hunting Debate - Episode 2

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590   24 days ago
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590   24 days ago
The second in the series of these long-overdue debates was a an electrifying event that took place on April 23rd, 2022, between British Member of Parliament, Sir Roger Gale, a staunch opponent of Trophy Hunting, and Jens Ulrich Hoch, Hunter and Communications officer for Nordic Safari Club. Jens wishes to stress that there is a difference between his organization, Nordic Safari Club, (https://www.nordisksafariklub.com/) and the Nordic Chapter of SCI. ( https://royalnordicchapter.com/). There was confusion over this issue in the debate.
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Sir Gale,

It saddens me to see a conservative MP so ill informed and led by emotion to the point that they would repeatedly lie and twist the words of an honourable and honest man. I have been supporter of the conservative party and I am a keen British hunter, hunting in Africa is very similar to how deer is managed in the UK, only in Southern Africa the local population has more of a stake in the wildlife management than we do here in UK.

The British population has come so far detached from what is required to farm both crops and livestock because the British government promoted the poaching of wildlife over hundred of years to increase farmed produce so we have never in a modern Britian got the opportunity to live truly side by side with wild animals like Africa. In Britian wealthy politicians and royalty were the only ones to have a stake in wildlife until around 60 years ago which makes us as a nation too ill informed lecture to Africa and insinuate that they are "corrupt" and
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First of all thank you for that you did arrange this very very important forum to let us hear the both side of the same coin. I live in Sweden and can say I am very sad that this Nordic club are here. I have never heard about it before but very good to know about it so you know whats going on around the corner. For me its totaly awful how anybody can justify to going and kill a wild animal wherever it is and say its contribute to conservation? How can it be possible? I dont understand it at all. WHEN THE WILDLIFE IS GONE ITS GONE!!! The only time its okej to kill or shot an wild animal it should be when its sick or to old and cant survive by his own. To justify this when the scientsts and conservationists screaming out that many species are declining dramaticaly like lions etc. Jens did say it, they see an excitment in hunt initself, but deny he not like to kill, it is exacly what they do nothing else.What he did tell about woolfs in Sweden was the truth Nicole Morgny
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Thank you all for your comments. Apologies for the technical difficulties we are experiencing. They are being worked on. Please bear with us.
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According to the African Wildlife Foundation, in just two decades, the lion populations have decreased by 43 percent, and it’s estimated that as few as 23,000 remain today.
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Trophy hunters have no regard for the ethical implications of their barbaric hobby.
Studies have shown that most of the trophy hunting revenue stays within the hunting industry, and that when compared to tourism it´s generated value is almost nil. Take for example the case of South Africa where trophy hunting brought $341 million for the 2015/16 season in contrast to the $22.1 billion brought by tourism in 2019.
Even in the case that trophy hunting were a profitable business benefiting the local communities it would still not be an ethical enterprise. As long as trophy hunting continues, it will prevent non-consumptive forms of nature tourism from establishing in the local economies, and will perpetuate the false narrative that hunting is indispensable to conservation.
https://www.bornfreeusa.org/campaigns/wildlife-trade/trophy-hunting-busting-myths
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Not able to open replies…?
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https://www.fieldsportschannel.tv/british-mp-calls-botswana-president-a-corrupt-vandal-and-his-actions-led-to-murder/
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This old "flogged to death" Horse should be divided up in bite size chunks. Firstly the arguments of those opposed are based on their principles including ethics and morals. This in turn is linked with the regulation, or lack of it or shortcomings if you will, of the Industry and secondly it involves the sustainability and the impact on the remaining populations of, especially, threatened or endangered Species. There should also be a distinction between the status of the Land where such hunts take place as that again in turn has bearing on the ownership and control of the Wildlife hunted. One size does not fit all and relative context is needed before opinions can be aired. There is a huge difference, for example, between Wildlife hunted on Freehold Land, i.e. Private Game Farms and Wildlife hunted on State owned Land under management of Conservancy Communities. On Freehold Land the owner invariably invests in stock, managing it in a businesslike fashion with strict stock control.
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@PamDolan - could you please supply the Hour/min/second from the timeline (at the bottom of the video window) where Sir Roger is racist?
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Sir Gale,
While I can accept your feelings about hunters, you are welcome to have that opinion, but you are not welcome to make up your own facts.

I don't even know where to start. There are more wildlife professionals in South Africa managing land double the size of Scotland. Yet you claim we don't know what we are doing.

But the worst thing of all is that you are abusing your position to undermine successful wildlife policy in Africa through forcing a boycott on an economy that supports wildife.

A few facts. Is that the lion population is stable or increasing in South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe.

I wish that you would visit these areas that far exceed the size of UK before you take a stance that is ultimately destructive to conservation efforts.
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